Validity of the minimum data set for assessing nutritional status in nursing home residents

TitleValidity of the minimum data set for assessing nutritional status in nursing home residents
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1997
AuthorsBlaum C.S, O'Neill E.F, Clements K.M, Fries B.E, Fiatarone M.A
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume66
Issue4
Pagination787-94
Date PublishedOct
Accession Number9322551
Keywords*Homes for the Aged/ut [Utilization], *Inpatients/cl [Classification], *Nursing Homes/ut [Utilization], *Nutrition Assessment, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Anthropometry, Body Composition, Body Constitution, Boston, Comparative Study, Cross-Sectional Studies, Electric Impedance, Female, Homes for the Aged/sn [Statistics & Numerical Data], Human, Male, Nursing Homes/sn [Statistics & Numerical Data], Nutritional Status, Odds Ratio, Sex Characteristics, Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S., Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract

The Minimum Data Set (MDS), a Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA)-mandated resident assessment system used in community nursing homes, is potentially useful for assessing nutritional status. We compared anthropometric measures of nutritional status available in the MDS [weight and body mass index (BMI)] with other anthropometric and bioelectrical measures of nutritional status, not available on the MDS. We also studied associations of MDS-measured clinical characteristics of nursing home residents with anthropometric and bioelectrical measures of lower and higher nutritional status, defined as measures in the 25th percentile and below, and 75th percentile and above, respectively. Data were from a sample of residents of an academic long-term care facility (n = 186, 75% female, mean age 89.9 +/- 5.6 y). Results were as follows: 1) MDS measures of weight and BMI were significantly correlated with all the anthropometric and bioelectrical measures of nutritional status in women, and most measures in men; 2) some MDS variables, including poor oral intake and advanced cognitive decline, were significantly associated with two or more anthropometric and bioelectrical measures of low nutritional status; and 3) complaints of hunger were significantly associated with two or more anthropometric and bioelectrical measures of high nutritional status. Results suggest that 1) weight and BMI, available in the MDS, are correlated with other measures of nutritional status not available, and 2) MDS clinical variables are associated with measures of low and high nutritional status, and may be useful in identifying patients at nutritional risk.

Short TitleAm J Clin NutrAm J Clin Nutr
Alternate JournalAm J Clin Nutr