Stress, social engagement and psychological well-being in institutional settings: Evidence based on the minimum data set 2.0

TitleStress, social engagement and psychological well-being in institutional settings: Evidence based on the minimum data set 2.0
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2000
AuthorsGilbart E.E, Hirdes J.P
JournalCanadian Journal on Aging
Volume19
IssueSUPPL. 2
Pagination50-66
Keywords*pain, *stress, *wellbeing, Aged, article, elderly care, evidence based medicine, Human, institutional care, major clinical study, psychological aspect, social aspect, social support
Abstract

While a substantial body of literature has emerged on the relationships between stress, social support and well-being in community-based older persons, few studies have examined institutionalized populations. The present study used data from pilot studies of the MDS 2.0 in three hospitals, along with supplementary surveys related to psychological well-being. It was found that patients with higher social engagement scores tended to have higher levels of well-being, and this effect was greatest among those with more stable physical health. Pain was an important predictor of lower well-being. Since the MDS 2.0 provides a comprehensive approach to identifying and responding to social, psychological and physical problems in institutionalized older persons, it can have an important impact on well-being when used to support decision making and clinical intervention.