Use of antipsychotics among nonagenarian residents in long-term institutional care in Finland

TitleUse of antipsychotics among nonagenarian residents in long-term institutional care in Finland
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsAlanen H-M, Finne-Soveri H, Noro A, Leinonen E
JournalAge Ageing
Volume35
Issue5
Pagination508-513
Date PublishedSeptember 1, 2006
Abstract

Background: there is a paucity of information about the use of antipsychotic medication in long-term care, especially among the oldest-old residents. Objective: to analyse the factors associated with the use of antipsychotic medication among nonagenarian residents in long-term institutional care. Design: a retrospective study was designed from cross-sectional data, gathered in the period 1 January 2003 to 30 June 2003, in Finland. Data were extracted from the Resident Assessment Instrument database, based on Minimum Data Set 2.0 assessments. Setting: data were provided by 23 hospital-based institutions and 43 residential homes. Subjects: residents aged [≥]90 years were included, consisting of 1,334 resident assessments. Results: almost a third of the residents received one or more antipsychotic medication. In the logistic regression analysis, factors associated with the use of antipsychotics among nonagenarian residents were as follows: socially inappropriate or disruptive behavioural symptoms [odds ratio (OR) 1.86, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36-2.54], concomitant anxiolytic medication (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.39-2.42), recurring anxious complaints (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.17-2.22), recurring physical movements (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.08-1.91) and unsettled relationships (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.15-1.57). A good sense of initiative or involvement was significantly less likely to be associated with antipsychotics (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.80-0.94). There were no associations between any psychiatric diagnoses or symptoms and the use of antipsychotics. Conclusions: antipsychotic medication use in nonagenarians in long-term institutions was common and seemed in many cases to be associated with residents' negative attitudes to others. Querulous residents received antipsychotics more commonly than those with good social skills. Clearly defined indications may not be fulfilled in many cases, and an evaluation of treatment may be lacking. These may indicate that in Finland, there could be a considerable gap between antipsychotic medication recommendations and actual clinical practice.

URLhttp://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/35/5/508
DOI10.1093/ageing/afl065
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