Changes in social engagement and depression predict incident loneliness among seriously ill home care clients

TitleChanges in social engagement and depression predict incident loneliness among seriously ill home care clients
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsFernandes S., Davidson J.GS, Guthrie D.M
JournalPalliative & Supportive Care
Volume16
Issue2
Pagination170-179
Date PublishedApr
ISBN Number1478-9515
Accession Number28300018
Keywords*Home care, *Loneliness, *Older adults, *Palliative Care, *rai-hc, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cohort Studies, Depression/*etiology/psychology, Female, Home Care Services/organization & administration, Humans, Incidence, Logistic Models, Loneliness/*psychology, Male, Ontario, Psychometrics/instrumentation/methods, Social Isolation/*psychology
Abstract

ABSTRACTObjective:This study identified the predictors of incident loneliness in a group of seriously ill older adults (aged 65+) receiving home care. METHOD: Existing data collected with the Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (RAI-HC) were utilized. A cohort of clients (N = 2,499) with two RAI-HC assessments and no self-reported loneliness at time 1 were included. Self-reported loneliness, upon reassessment, was the outcome of interest. Clients with a prognosis of less than six months or severe health instability were included. RESULTS: The average length of time between assessments was 5.9 months (standard deviation = 4.10). During that time, 7.8% (n = 181) of the sample developed loneliness. In a multivariate regression model, worsening symptoms of depression, a decline in social activities, and not living with a primary caregiver all increased the risk of loneliness. SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: These results highlight how changes in psychosocial factors over time can contribute to loneliness, which can inform clinicians as they seek to identify those who may be at risk for loneliness.

URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28300018
DOI10.1017/S1478951517000128
Alternate JournalPalliative & supportive care