Last three days of life in the hospital: a comparison of symptoms, signs and treatments in the young old and the oldest old patients using the Resident assessment instrument for palliative care

TitleLast three days of life in the hospital: a comparison of symptoms, signs and treatments in the young old and the oldest old patients using the Resident assessment instrument for palliative care
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsSteindal S.A, Ranhoff A.H, Bredal I.S, Sorbye L.W, Lerdal A.
JournalInternational Journal of Older People Nursing
Volume8
Issue3
Pagination199-206
Date PublishedSep
Type of ArticleComparative Study
ISBN Number1748-3743
Accession Number22329702
Keywords*Accidental Falls/sn [Statistics & Numerical Data], *Geriatric Nursing, *Hospitalization/sn [Statistics & Numerical Data], *Palliative Care/sn [Statistics & Numerical Data], *Terminal Care/sn [Statistics & Numerical Data], Age Distribution, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cross-Sectional Studies, Delirium/ep [Epidemiology], Edema/ep [Epidemiology], Female, Humans, Male, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Symptom Assessment/sn [Statistics & Numerical Data]
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Knowledge concerning the provision of end of life care to the oldest old hospitalised patients is deficient.AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To analyse whether there were differences in registered nurses' documentation of the young old vs. the oldest old patients according to symptoms, clinical signs and treatment in the last 3 days of life.DESIGN: Data were collected retrospectively in a cross-sectional comparative study at a hospital between autumn 2007 and spring 2009. Methods. The study included 190 patients: 101 (65-84 years) and 89 (85+). Data were extracted from the patients' electronic records using the Resident Assessment Instrument for Palliative Care (RAI-PC).RESULTS: Falls (OR = 4.01, 95% CI 1.47-10.90) and peripheral oedema (OR = 2.74, 95% CI 1.06-7.11) were significantly more frequent documented in the oldest old patients compared with the young old patients. Delirium was recorded in 15.3% of all patients.CONCLUSION: With the exception of more falls and peripheral oedema in the oldest old patients, this study showed no differences in symptoms and treatment between the young old and the oldest old patients. Delirium was poorly documented compared to other studies. Implications for practice. The oldest old patients have a higher risk of falls in the final phase of life, and fall prevention should be considered.Copyright © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22
DOI10.1111/j.1748-3743.2012.00313.x
Short TitleInt J Older People NursInt J Older People Nurs
Alternate JournalInt J Older People Nurs